Precision Medicine Conference

Advances in Precision Medicine: Big Data

Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative 3rd Annual Conference

April 8th, 2019

REGISTER HERE

The Forum, Columbia University, Manhattanville Campus

High-throughput molecular profiling technologies and the increasing availability of clinical data for research and in electronic health records give major opportunities to accelerate precision medicine using a variety of computational methods. We will learn about the latest research in machine learning, genomics, clinical research, electronic health records and data science.

8am                 Coffee and light breakfast

Prologue

8:45am            Tom Maniatis: Welcome to CPMI 3rd Annual Conference

8:50am            Jeanette Wing, PhD, Columbia University: Introduction

Jeannette M. Wing is Avanessians Director of the Data Science Institute and Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. She came to Columbia in July 2017 from Microsoft, where she served as Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Research, overseeing a global network of research labs. She is widely recognized for her intellectual leadership in computer science, particularly in trustworthy computing.  

Session 1

9am            Ewan Birney, PhD, EMBL-EBI

Ewan Birney is co-Director of EMBL-EBI. He is also EMBL-EBI's Joint Head of Research. Ewan led the analysis of the Human Genome gene set, mouse and chicken genomes and the ENCODE project, focusing on non-coding elements of the human genome. Ewan is a non-executive Director of Genomics England. Ewan’s main areas of research include functional genomics, DNA algorithms, statistical methods to analyse genomic information (in particular information associated with individual differences in humans and Medaka fish) and use of images for chromatin structure.

9.40am        Goncalo Abecassis, PhD, Regeneron

Gonçalo Abecasis, Ph.D., serves as the Vice President and Head of Analytical Genomics and Data Sciences at the Regeneron Genetics Center. In this role, Dr. Abecasis oversees statistical genetics and quantitative data sciences, driving novel genomic discovery at the RGC. He and his team conduct discovery research in support of new target discovery, pharmacogenomics, and translational follow up that cuts across all therapeutic areas. Dr. Abecasis and the RGC are leading innovative data science on some of the largest genomics datasets, including the UK Biobank and Regeneron-Geisinger DiscovEHR study, and developing cutting edge applications and tools to facilitate large scale analysis and mining of discovery results.

10.20am      Richard Durbin, PhD, Wellcome Sanger Institute

Richard Durbin, Associate Professor, Wellcome Sanger Institute, is involved in a wide variety of genomic genetics projects from a computational and mathematical perspective. Current interests include human genetic variation, evolutionary and population genetics and algorithms and software for high throughput sequencing.

11am               Coffee break

Session 2

11.30am      Rich Bonneau, PhD, NYU

Richard Bonneau, Courrant Institute, Flatiron, is focused on a number of computational biology problems that, if solved, would remove key bottlenecks in biology and systems biology. His lab focuses on two main categories of computational biology: learning networks from functional genomics data and predicting and modeling protein structure. 

12.10am      Ron Shamir, MD, Tel Aviv University

Ron Shamir holds the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Chair in Bioinformatics, and is the founder and head of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Bioinformatics at Tel Aviv University. His current research focuses on integrative analysis of heterogeneous high-throughput bio-medical data, genome rearrangements in cancer, and gene regulation.

12.50pm      Barbara Engelhardt, PhD, Princeton University

Barbara Engelhardt, is an Assistant Professor, Princeton. Interspersed among her academic experiences, she spent two years working at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a summer at Google Research, and a year at 23andMe, a DNA ancestry service. Professor Engelhardt is currently a PI on the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) Consortium. Her research interests involve statistical models and methods for analysis of high-dimensional data, with a goal of understanding the underlying biological mechanisms of complex phenotypes and human diseases.

1.30pm                        Lunch

Session 3

2.30pm        George Hripcsak, PhD, Columbia University

George Hripcsak is Vivian Beaumont Allen Professor, chair of Columbia’s Department of Biomedical Informatics, and director of medical informatics services for New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Hripcsak is a board-certified internist with degrees in chemistry, medicine, and biostatistics. He led the effort to create the Arden Syntax, a language for representing health knowledge that has become a national standard. His current research is on the clinical information stored in electronic health records. Using data mining techniques, he is developing the methods necessary to support clinical research and patient safety initiatives. As chair of the AMIA Standards Committee, he coordinated the medical informatics community response to the Department of Health and Human Services for the health informatics standards rules under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.

3.10pm        Mihaela van der Schaar, PhD, University of Oxford, UK

Mihaela van der Schaar is Man Professor of Quantitative Finance in the Oxford – Man Institute of Quantitative Finance (OMI) and the Department of Engineering Science at Oxford, Fellow of Christ Church College and Faculty Fellow of the Alan Turing Institute, London. Her research interests and expertise are in machine learning, data science and decisions for a better planet. In particular, she is interested in developing machine learning and decision theory for finance, medicine and personalized education. She also has research interests and expertise in game theory and applications, and in social, economic and biological networks. She leads the Data Science and Decisions Research Group. 

3.50pm        Jennifer Listgarten, PhD, UC Berkeley

Jennifer Listgarten is Professor at UC Berkeley in the department of EECS and the Center for Computational Biology. She is also a member of the steering committee for the Berkeley AI Research Lab and a Chan Zuckerberg Investigator. Her expertise is in machine learning, applied statistics and computational biology. Her research focuses in developing methods to enable new insight into basic biology and medicine. From 2007 to 2017, Professor Listgarten was at Microsoft Research.

4.30pm        Reception

Accomplishing the objectives of CPMI requires advancing basic science, and the application of the resulting knowledge to the identification of genetic causes of human diseases, to the understanding of disease mechanisms, and ultimately to the treatment of a wide range of human diseases—from cancer to neurological diseases. To this end, CPMI is a truly University-wide effort. The bedrock of the initiative is strong basic and translational biomedical science practiced at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, the Zuckerman Institute, and the Morningside campus. Success of the initiative will also require many other academic disciplines at Columbia ranging from humanities, to engineering, to law and business.

With breathtaking advances in DNA sequencing, computer science, and clinical medicine, it is virtually certain that the number of diseases diagnosed and treated on the basis of genome sequence information will increase dramatically during the next decade. In addition, as we learn more about the relationship between genetic mutations, human biology, and disease, the genome sequence will play a central role in the practice of medicine. I believe that Columbia University, as a great liberal arts and scientific institution, is ideally positioned to bring the full force of an extraordinarily diverse and talented faculty to bear on the advancement of precision medicine.

Columbia University is a world leader in medicine, science, and technology, from fundamental discoveries to the clinic. The Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative (CPMI) utilizes the vast intellectual resources of Columbia faculty to drive this revolution in health care.

Advances in Precision Medicine: Cancer Genomics was held on Monday April 9th, 2018, on the Columbia University Medical Campus. We hosted 10 top international speakers, together bringing a broad focus spanning from research insights to clinical applications of cancer genomics.

Arul M. Chinnaiyan, University of Michigan

Luis Diaz, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Arnold Levine, Institute for Advanced Studies

William C. Hahn, Broad Institute; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Serena Nik-Zainal, University of Cambridge

Raul Rabadan, Columbia University

Nitzan Rosenfeld, University of Cambridge

Charles Sawyers, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

David Tuveson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Catherine Wu, Broad Institute; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

CPMI 2nd Annual Conference
CPMI 2nd Annual Conference
CPMI 2nd Annual Conference
CPMI 2nd Annual Conference

At the Inaugural Columbia Precision Medicine Initiative (CPMI) conference: Advances in Precision Medicine: Genetics, we heard about cutting-edge genetics research from international leaders in the field whose research advances the basic science of genetics and impacts the application of genetics to the understanding and treatment of human genetic disease. 

Accomplishing the objectives of CPMI requires advancing basic science, and the application of the resulting knowledge to the identification of genetic causes of human diseases, the understanding of disease mechanisms, and ultimately to the treatment of a wide range of human diseases ranging from cancer to neurological diseases. To this end, CPMI is a truly University-wide effort. The bedrock of the initiative is strong basic and translational biomedical science practiced in the Medical School, the new Zuckerman Mind Brain and Behavior Institute, and the Morningside campus. Success of the Initiative will also require many other academic disciplines at Columbia ranging from humanities, to engineering, to law and business.

With breathtaking advances in DNA sequencing, computer science, and clinical medicine, it is virtually certain that the number of diseases diagnosed and treated on the basis of genome sequence information will increase dramatically during the next decade. In addition, as we learn more about the relationship between genetic mutations, human biology, and disease, the genome sequence will play a central role in the practice of medicine. I believe the technology is here and essential groundwork has been established. Columbia University is ideally positioned to bring the full force of an extraordinarily diverse and talented faculty to bear on the advancement of precision medicine. 

John Hardy, PhD: Personalized Medicine for the Major Neurodegenerative Diseases: Genetic Predictions & Mechanistic Insights 

Jonathan Pritchard, PhD: The Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits: From Polygenic to Omnigenic

David Goldstein, PhD: Precision Neurology 2017

CPMI Conference 2017
CPMI Conference 2017
CPMI Conference 2017