Leadership

Senior Leadership

  • Tom Maniatis is the Isidore S. Edelman Professor and Chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular biophysics at the Columbia University Medical Center. In 2014, he was appointed Director of the Columbia’s Precision Medicine Initiative - a University-wide initiative founded by University President Lee Bollinger. In addition, he was recently named Scientific Director and Chief Executive Officer of the New York Genome Center.

    Dr. Maniatis is known for pioneering the development of gene cloning technology and its application to both basic research and biotechnology. He also coauthored the definitive laboratory manual on Molecular Cloning. His research has led to fundamental advances in understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation and RNA splicing, the biochemistry of innate immunity signaling pathways, the function of single cell diversity in the nervous system, and neurodegenerative disease mechanisms.

    Dr. Maniatis’ research has been recognized by many awards, including the Eli Lilly Award in Microbiology and Immunology, The Richard Lounsbery Award for Biology and Medicine (Awarded by the French and U.S National Academy of Sciences), and the 2012 Lasker-Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Science, the U.S. Academy of Medicine, and a fellow of the U.S. Academy of Arts and Sciences.

    Dr. Maniatis cofounded the New York Genome Center in 2011. He is also a pioneer in the biotechnology industry, co-founding Genetics Institute in 1980, ProScript, and Acceleron. Recently Dr. Maniatis cofounded “Kallyope”, a New York city-based gut/brain axis company.

    His laboratory is currently focused on molecular neuroscience, with interests in the role single cell diversity in brain wiring, and disease mechanisms in the neurodegenerative disease ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). Dr. Maniatis’ laboratory manual on Molecular Cloning was instrumental in the wide dissemination of DNA cloning methods internationally for over 30 years.

    Dr. Maniatis received his B.A. and MS. degrees from the University of Colorado in chemistry and biology, and his Ph.D. in molecular biology from Vanderbilt University. After postdoctoral studies at Harvard University and the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, England, Dr. Maniatis was a professor at the California Institute of Technology and subsequently at Harvard University.

  • Lee Goldman, MD, MPH, is the Harold and Margaret Hatch Professor, Executive Vice President and Dean of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Medicine, and Chief Executive of Columbia University Medical Center. He serves as Dean of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and also is administratively responsible for the Mailman School of Public Health, the College of Dental Medicine, and the School of Nursing. Dr. Goldman earned his undergraduate, medical, and master of public health degrees from Yale University. He received his clinical training in medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and at Massachusetts General Hospital, and in cardiology at Yale New Haven Hospital. Before joining Columbia University in 2006, he was the Julius R. Krevans Distinguished Professor, Chair of the Department of Medicine, and Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs of the School of Medicine at UCSF. Prior to moving to San Francisco, he served as Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Professor of Epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, and Vice Chair of the Department of Medicine and later Chief Medical Officer at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

    Dr. Goldman’s research on the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for heart disease has transformed the delivery of medical care. He is best known for his work in predicting the cardiac risk of non-cardiac surgery (the “Goldman Index”), determining which patients with chest pain require hospitalization (“the Goldman Criteria,” featured in Malcolm Gladwell's Blink), and establishing priorities for preventing and treating coronary artery disease (the Coronary Heart Disease Policy Model). Dr. Goldman's research has led to the proliferation of the now ubiquitous chest pain evaluation units. He coauthored the article that coined the term “hospitalist” and created the first academic hospitalist program in the U.S. His 450-plus publications include more than 20 first- or senior-authored articles in The New England Journal of Medicine, the premier journal for patient-oriented research. 

    Dr. Goldman is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation; past President of the Association of American Physicians, the Society of General Internal Medicine, and the Association of Professors of Medicine; a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; a past director of the American Board of Internal Medicine; and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. He is the recipient of the highest awards from the Society of General Internal Medicine (the Glaser Award), the American College of Physicians (the John Phillips Award), and the Association of Professors of Medicine (the Williams Award), as well as the Blake Award from the Association of American Physicians and the Outstanding Achievement Award in Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke from the American Heart Association. Dr. Goldman is a past associate editor of The New England Journal of Medicine and editor of The American Journal of Medicine. He is the lead editor of the renowned Cecil Textbook of Medicine, which was renamed Goldman-Cecil Medicine. His most recent book, Too Much of a Good Thing: How Four Key Survival Traits Are Now Killing Us, was published in 2015.

  • Lee C. Bollinger became Columbia University’s nineteenth president in 2002.  Under his leadership, Columbia stands again at the very top rank of great research universities, distinguished by comprehensive academic excellence, historic institutional development, an innovative and sustainable approach to global engagement, and unprecedented levels of alumni involvement and financial stability.

    President Bollinger teaching a Law School class devoted to questions raised in his book, Uninhibited, Robust, and Wide-Open: A Free Press for a New Century

    President Bollinger is Columbia’s first Seth Low Professor of the University, a member of the Columbia Law School faculty, and one of the country’s foremost First Amendment scholars.  Each fall semester, he teaches “Freedom of Speech and Press” to Columbia undergraduate and graduate students.  His most recent book, Uninhibited, Robust, and Wide-Open: A Free Press for a New Century, has placed Bollinger at the center of public discussion about the importance of global free speech to continued social progress.

    As president of the University of Michigan, Bollinger led the school’s historic litigation in Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger.  These Supreme Court decisions that upheld and clarified the importance of diversity as a compelling justification for affirmative action in higher education were reaffirmed in the Court’s 2016 ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas.  He speaks and writes frequently about the value of racial, cultural, and socio-economic diversity to American society through opinion columns, media interviews, and public appearances around the country.  Columbia itself remains one of the most diverse universities among its peer institutions and has seen the number of applicants to Columbia College and the selectivity of admissions at the school reach record levels.

    As Columbia’s president, Bollinger conceived and led the University’s most ambitious expansion in over a century with the creation of the Manhattanville campus in West Harlem, the first campus plan in the nation to receive the U.S. Green Building Council’s highest certification for sustainable development.  An historic community benefits agreement emerging from the city and state review process for the new campus provides Columbia’s local neighborhoods with decades of investment in the community’s health, education and economic growth.

    The first two buildings, the Jerome L. Greene Science Center and the Lenfest Center for the Arts will open by 2017.  The Jerome L. Greene Science Center will be the headquarters of the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, a cornerstone venture among Columbia’s expanding interdisciplinary initiatives in neuroscience, nanotechnology and precision medicine.  The home of state-of-the-art performance, screening, and presentation spaces, and a vibrant, publicly accessible venue for Columbia’s Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, the Lenfest Center will allow Columbia University School of the Arts to realize the creative vision of students and faculty, while becoming an active, engaged partner with the thriving cultural life of Upper Manhattan.

    Bollinger’s commitment to excellence in architecture is evident across Columbia’s campuses, from Renzo Piano’s master plan for Manhattanville, to Rafael Moneo’s design for the Northwest Corner Building on the historic Morningside campus, to the new Columbia Sports Center at Baker Field Athletics Complex designed by Steven Holl.

    Among Bollinger’s signal achievements at Columbia are the development of a network of eight Columbia Global Centers on four continents and the creation of new venues on the University’s home campus supporting global conversations and scholarship, including the World Leaders Forum and the Committee on Global Thought. 

    From November 1996 to 2002, Bollinger was the President of the University of Michigan, where he also had served as a law professor and dean of the Law School.

    He is a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society.  He is widely published on legal and constitutional issues involving free speech and press, and his books include: The Tolerant Society: Freedom of Speech and Extremist Speech in AmericaImages of a Free Press; and Eternally Vigilant: Free Speech in the Modern Era.  In January 2010, Uninhibited, Robust, and Wide Open: A Press for a New Century was published by Oxford University Press.

    Bollinger has received the National Humanitarian Award from the National Conference for Community and Justice and the National Equal Justice Award from the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund for his leadership on affirmative action.  He also received the Clark Kerr Award, the highest award conferred by the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, for his service to higher education, especially on matters of freedom of speech and diversity.  He is the recipient of 10 honorary degrees from universities in this country and abroad.

    Bollinger is a director of Graham Holdings Company (formerly The Washington Post Company), serves as a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board, and is a Trustee of The Kresge Foundation.

    After graduating from the University of Oregon and Columbia Law School, where he was an Articles Editor of the Law Review, Bollinger served as law clerk for Judge Wilfred Feinberg on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and for Chief Justice Warren Burger on the United States Supreme Court.  He joined the University of Michigan Law School faculty in 1973.

    Bollinger was born in Santa Rosa, California, and raised there and in Baker, Oregon.  He is married to artist Jean Magnano Bollinger, and they have two children and five grandchildren.

  • John H. Coatsworth is the Provost of Columbia University, as well as Professor of International and Public Affairs and of History.

    Provost Coatsworth is a leading scholar of Latin American economic and international history. Previously, he was Dean of the School of International and Public Affairs. Prior to his appointment as Dean in 2008, he served as a visiting professor at Columbia University (2006 – 2007) and Interim Dean of SIPA (2007 – 2008). 

    Before Joining Columbia, Coatsworth served as the Monroe Gutman Professor of Latin American Affairs at Harvard University (1992–2007). He was the founding director of Harvard's David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies and the chair of the Harvard University Committee on Human Rights Studies. Prior to his work at Harvard, Coatsworth was a member of the faculty at the University of Chicago (1969–1992). Other academic posts have included visiting professorships at El Colegio de México, the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the National University of Buenos Aires, the Instituto Torcuato di Tella in Buenos Aires, and the Instituto Ortega y Gassett in Madrid.

    Coatsworth is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Board of Directors of the Tinker Foundation and numerous professional associations. He is the former president of the American Historical Association and Latin American Studies Association. Coatsworth has served on the editorial boards of scholarly journals including the American Historical Review, the Journal of Economic History, the Hispanic American Historical Review and other social science journals published in Britain, Chile, Germany, Mexico, Peru, and Spain.

    In 1986, Coatsworth was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. He has served as Senior Fulbright Lecturer three times, with appointments in Argentina and Mexico, and has received numerous research and institutional grants from public agencies and private foundations. He has acted as a consultant for program design or review to numerous U.S. universities and foundations.

    Coatsworth received his BA in History from Wesleyan University, and his MA and PhD in Economic History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Leadership

David Goldstein

Professor of Genetics and Development

Amelia Alverson

Executive Vice President of University Development and Alumni Relations

Paul Appelbaum

Elizabeth K. Dollard Professor of Psychiatry, Medicine and Law

Richard Axel

University Professor of Biochemistry, Molecular Biophysics and Pathology

Suzanne Bakken

Alumni Professor of the School of Nursing and Professor of Biomedical Informatics; Director, Center for Evidence-based Practice in the Underserved

Peter Bearman

Jonathan R. Cole Professor of Sociology; Director, Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theories and Empirics

DuBois Bowman

Professor of Biostatistics; Chair, Department of Biostatistics

Mary Boyce

Dean of The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science and Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor; Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Andrea Califano

Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Biology (in Biomedical Informatics) and Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics (in the Institute for Cancer Genetics); Chair, Department of Systems Biology

Angela Christiano

Richard and Mildred Rhodebeck Professor of Dermatology and Professor of Genetics and Development; Director, Basic Science Research Group of Dermatology

Wendy Chung

Associate Professor of Pediatrics (in Medicine)

Steve Coll

Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism and Henry R. Luce Professor of Journalism

Mary D'Alton

Willard C. Rappleye Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Chair, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Director of Services, Sloan Hospital for Women

Harold Edgar

Julius Silver Professor of Law, Science and Technology

Ken Forde

University Trustee; Jose M. Ferrer Professor Emeritus of Surgery

Linda Fried

Dean of the Mailman School of Public Health and DeLamar Professor of Public Health Practice; Senior Vice President, Columbia University Medical Center; Professor of Epidemiology and of Medicine

Linda Green

Armand G. Erpf Professor of Business

George Hripcsak

Vivian Beaumont Allen Professor of Biomedical Informatics; Chair, Department of Biomedical Informatics

Tony Jebara

Associate Professor of Computer Science

Jingyue Ju

Samuel Ruben-Peter G. Viele Professor of Engineering

Gerard Karsenty

Paul A. Marks Professor of Genetics and Development and Professor of Medicine; Chair, Department of Genetics and Development

Don Landry

Samuel Bard Professor of Medicine; Chair, Department of Medicine

David Madigan

Executive Vice President for Arts and Sciences and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences; Professor of Statistics

Richard Mayeux

Gertrude H. Sergievsky Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry and Epidemiology (in the Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center and Taub Institute for Research of Alzheimer’s Disease and the Aging Brain); Chair, Department of Neurology; Director, Gertrude H. Sergievsky

G. Michael Purdy

Executive Vice President for Research; Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Jack Rowe

Professor of Health Policy and Management

Ursula Staudinger

Robert N. Butler Professor; Director, Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center

Christian Stohler

Dean of the College of Dental Medicine; Senior Vice President for Dental Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center; Professor of Dental Medicin

P. Roy Vagelos

Chair, Board of Advisors, Columbia University Medical Center; Chairman of the Board, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals; Retired Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Merck & Co. Inc.

Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic

Mikati Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Medical Sciences (in Medicine)

Charles Zuker

Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics and Neuroscience